Phát âm chuẩn cùng VOA – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Senegal Women Literacy (VOA)
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Phát âm chuẩn cùng VOA – Anh ngữ đặc biệt: Senegal Women Literacy (VOA)19328

Học tiếng Anh hiệu quả, nhanh chóng: http://www.facebook.com/HocTiengAnhVOA, http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html. Nếu không vào được VOA, xin hãy vào http://vn3000.com để vượt tường lửa. Các chương trình học tiếng Anh miễn phí của VOA (VOA Learning English for Vietnamese) có thể giúp bạn cải tiến kỹ năng nghe và phát âm, hiểu rõ cấu trúc ngữ pháp, và sử dụng Anh ngữ một cách chính xác. Xem thêm: http://www.facebook.com/VOATiengViet

Luyện nghe nói và học từ vựng tiếng Anh qua video. Xem các bài học kế tiếp: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD7C5CB40C5FF0531

Edu: Luyện nghe nói tiếng Anh qua video: Chương trình học tiếng Anh của VOA: Special English Education Report. Xin hãy vào http://www.voatiengviet.com/section/hoc-tieng-anh/2693.html để xem các bài kế tiếp.

More and more Africans are using text messages, e-mail and social media to communicate. In Senegal, educators are using new technologies to teach women to read. The United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, UNESCO, launched the program in Senegal two years ago. But UNESCO officials are now expanding it to as many as six other African countries. Mariama Daffe sits in front of a television at her home in a community near Senegal’s capital Dakar. She is learning to write and work with numbers. Ms. Daffe started this home-study program a year ago when she was 39. The Ministry of Education joined with UNESCO to create these training lessons for literacy — reading and writing. The program appears daily on state television. Women taking part say these lessons have made them more independent. Mariama Daffe says she can now read and write text messages on her own. Ms. Daffe says the TV programs are easy to fit into her busy life. She studies three lessons a week, yet she has a full-time job and a family. At-home study programs are also easy to operate and not costly. That makes them especially useful for a place like Senegal, which has limited money to teach literacy. But some women like the classroom experience. They can study at an elementary school nearby. Mamadou Diallo is a teacher there. He uses a laptop computer and a projector to prepare an interactive display wall. He says the women like to use the wall to solve math problems.